The White House became, quite simply, a political dive.

Some choice words for Republican leadership in the 20s. Via Ferdinand Lundberg’s ride through America’s Sixty Families (1937)

Even  in  their  superficial  aspects  the  successive Republican  Administrations (of Harding, Coolidge, Hoover) were  suspect.  They  differed  from  each  other  only  in the name  of  the  White  House  occupant.  Warren  G.  Harding  was an  amiable  drunkard  who  left  a  legacy  of  scandal  mere  allusion  to which  constitutes  a  breach  of  good  taste;  Calvin  Coolidge  simply did  what  he  was  told  by Andrew  W.  Mellon  and  by  Dwight  W. Morrow,  his  political  godfather;  Herbert  Hoover  was  an  erstwhile  vendor  and  promoter  of  shady  mining  stocks  who  before  the  war  had  been reprehended  by  an  English  court  for  his  role  in  a  promotional  swindle.   

"Harding,"  said  Alice  Longworth,  daughter  of  Theodore  Roosevclt,  in  a  summary  that  must  be  considered  scientifically  exact,  "was     not  a  bad  man.  He  was  just  a  slob." Coolidge,  according  to  Senator  Medill  McCormick,  part  owner  of  the  rabidly  Republican  Chicago Tribune,  was  a  plain  "boob."    He  was  so  shunned,  as  Vice-­President,  that  when  he  became  Chief  Executive  he  made  Senator  Frank  B. Kellogg,  the  only  man  in  Washington  who  had  spoken  a  kind  word  to  him,  his  Secretary  of  State.  

The  third  of  the  Republican  postwar Presidents (Hoover),  in  H.  L.  Mencken’s  judiciously  insulting  phrase,  was  a “fat  Coolidge,”  sweatingly  tremulous  under  the  domination  of Thomas  W.  Lamont  of  J.  P.  Morgan  and  Company,  whom  he  invariably  consulted  over  the  long-­distance  telephone  before  ever  announcing  any  decision  of  moment.  Of  Coolidge’s  ignorance  of  common  affairs,  which  was  transcended  only  by  Harding’s…

The  exceptionally  low  caliber  of  the  Coolidge  mentality  was never  better  illustrated  than  in  1921  when,  as  Vice-­President,  he  wrote  for  a  woman’s  magazine  a  series  of  articles  under  the  title,  ”Enemies of  the  Republic:  Are  the  Reds  Stalking  Our  College  Women?”

Text tagged as: warren_harding calvin_coolidge herbert_hoover h_l_mencken all_the_presidents_bankers ferdinand_lundberg

How Far We’ve Come

I feel like it’s kind of emasculating. — Google co-founder Sergey Brin on smartphones. Brin was promoting Google Glasses as the better (and more masculine) choice.

He thought the wearing of wrist watches by men to be effeminate. — About former Supreme Court Justice James Clark McReynolds. If you think Scalia is an asshole, read about this guy

Text tagged as: scalia james_clark_mcreynolds supreme_court google_glasses all_the_presidents_bankers
sunsetgun:

Albert Camus.

sunsetgun:

Albert Camus.

Photo tagged as: reblog - Reblog from sunsetgun
From sometime before 1907

From sometime before 1907

Photo tagged as: guns guncontrol
No compromise

No compromise

Photo tagged as: politico
WILSON WINS
November 6, 1912.

Woodrow Wilson was elected President yesterday and Thomas R. Marshall Vice President by an Electoral majority which challenged comparison with the year in which Horace Greeley was defeated by Grant. Until now, that year has always been the standard comparison for disastrous defeats, but the downfall of the Republican Party this year runs a close second. 

Electoral Votes: Wilson 409, Roosevelt 107, Taft 15. 

WILSON WINS

November 6, 1912.

Woodrow Wilson was elected President yesterday and Thomas R. Marshall Vice President by an Electoral majority which challenged comparison with the year in which Horace Greeley was defeated by Grant. Until now, that year has always been the standard comparison for disastrous defeats, but the downfall of the Republican Party this year runs a close second. 

Electoral Votes: Wilson 409, Roosevelt 107, Taft 15. 

Photo tagged as: woodrow_wilson 1912 infographic
Did not know this: 

Under Johnson, Dr. Hornig doubled the budget of what is now the Office of Science and Technology Policy, which he led, and pushed for federal research in housing and transportation. He also helped kill a proposal to put giant mirrors into orbit over Vietnam to spotlight the enemy at night.

Donald Hornig, Last to See First A-Bomb, Dies at 92
Pictured above: The Trinity tower. “At 9 p.m., I climbed the 100-foot tower to the top, where I baby-sat the live bomb.”

Did not know this: 

Under Johnson, Dr. Hornig doubled the budget of what is now the Office of Science and Technology Policy, which he led, and pushed for federal research in housing and transportation. He also helped kill a proposal to put giant mirrors into orbit over Vietnam to spotlight the enemy at night.

Donald Hornig, Last to See First A-Bomb, Dies at 92

Pictured above: The Trinity tower. “At 9 p.m., I climbed the 100-foot tower to the top, where I baby-sat the live bomb.”

Photo tagged as: donald_hornig atom_bomb mirrors_in_orbit vietnam

The Wall Street Journal Feels Your Pain

via

Text tagged as: wall_street_journal jacobin

Hitler & Gun Control

Alex Seitz-Wald interviews the historian Omer Bartov on the right-wing gun control meme entry under Hitler. His response cuts to the heart of it:

Bartov added that this misreading of history is not only intellectually dishonest, but also dangerous.  “I happen to have been a combat soldier and officer in the Israeli Defense Forces and I know what these assault rifles can do,” he said in an email.
He continued: “Their assertion that they need these guns to protect themselves from the government — as supposedly the Jews would have done against the Hitler regime — means not only that they are innocent of any knowledge and understanding of the past, but also that they are consciously or not imbued with the type of fascist or Bolshevik thinking that they can turn against a democratically elected government, indeed turn their guns on it, just because they don’t like its policies, its ideology, or the color, race and origin of its leaders.”
Text tagged as: hitler gun_control right_wing omer_bartov
By showing scenes of torture without taking any kind of moral (as opposed to tactical) stand on what we are seeing, Bigelow has made an amoral movie – which is, I would argue, an unconscionable approach to this material. I don’t understand those critics and commentators who denounce this film’s amorality and then go on to laud the movie anyway – as if a film’s moral stance, or lack of the same, was incidental to its achievement. Are we so cowed and wowed by cinematic technique that we can afford to lobotomize ourselves in this way? via

By showing scenes of torture without taking any kind of moral (as opposed to tactical) stand on what we are seeing, Bigelow has made an amoral movie – which is, I would argue, an unconscionable approach to this material. I don’t understand those critics and commentators who denounce this film’s amorality and then go on to laud the movie anyway – as if a film’s moral stance, or lack of the same, was incidental to its achievement. Are we so cowed and wowed by cinematic technique that we can afford to lobotomize ourselves in this way? via

Photo tagged as: zerodarkthirty

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